Impact Of Bribery And Corruption In Government

PRODUCTIVITY
PRODUCTIVITY
  • Format
  • Pages
  • Chapters

IMPACT OF BRIBERY AND CORRUPTION IN GOVERNMENT

TABLE OF CONTENT

CHAPTER ONE

Background of the study

Statement of problem

Research questions

Significance of study

Research objectives

Scope of study

CHAPTER TWO

Literature review

CHAPTER THREE

Research methodology

The population and sample

Content validity

Reliability of instrument

Research instrument

Administration of questionnaire

Collection of data

Data analysis

CHAPTER FOUR           

Analysis

CHAPTER FIVE   

Summary, conclusion and recommendations

Conclusion

Recommendation

REFERENCES     

QUESTIONNAIRE

Bribery

INTRODUCTION

Corruption and bribery are not victimless crimes. They hit the poorest people hardest and undermines economic development.

Corruption [is] among the greatest obstacles to economic and social development

The World Bank

No country is immune from corruption. [1] It flourishes where the criminal justice system and governance are weak, where decision-making is unaccountable and access to decision-makers is dependent on restricted social networks, where pay is low and where management controls are weak.

Poor people are the worst affected by corruption

The World Bank notes that the poor suffer the most from the petty corruption for the provision of public services: Empirical analysis has shown that the poor pay a higher share of their income on bribes than the rich An IMF study shows that an increase of just 0.78 per cent in corruption reduces the income growth of the poorest 20 per cent of the people in a country by 7.8 per cent a year. The Final Communiqué from the 2006 G8 St. Petersburg Summit is clear: The net effect of corruption is felt most directly, and disproportionately, by the poor.

Corruption compromises the effectiveness of aid

In poor countries, [corruption] can kill. Money meant for drugs for a sick child, or to build a hospital, can be siphoned off into overseas bank accounts or to build a luxury house.

Hilary Benn, Former UK Secretary of State for International Development

An estimated $100 billion of World Bank loans have been lost to corruption since the Bank’s foundation in December 1945; when other multilateral development banks are included, the figure rises to $200 billion. Such ‘leakage’ leads to aid ‘disappearing’ before it reaches the poor.

Corruption diverts expenditure away from health, education and the maintenance of infrastructure to high ‘kickback’ areas such as new construction and defence

The World Bank points out that while this corruption hurts society in general, it hurts the poor most since they are more vulnerable and dependent on the quality of governance and state support.

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